Личный опыт Subaru SVX

References

  1. Brian Long (2006). Subaru Impreza: The Road Car & WRC Story. p. 24. ISBN 1-84584-028-3.
  2. , p. 72.
  3. «Future cars». The Post and Courier. 11 January 1992. p. 1F. In Los Angeles, Subaru displayed a prototype called Amadeus that looks like its SVX sports coupe in station wagon form… Subaru has not decided whether to build the Amadeus for sale.
  4. «Subaru resumes production of SVX». Orlando Sentinel. 2 September 1993. p. F8.
  5. Dan Jedlica (14 September 1991). «Japan can do sports cars and sedans, too». Chicago Sun-Times. p. 27. It’s a shame this Porsche-fighter isn’t sold with a manual transmission, but Subaru has none to handle the power
  6. , pp. 36, 95.
  7. ^ Motorweek Road Test of the SVX, 1991
  8. Brian Long (2006). Subaru Impreza: The Road Car & WRC Story. p. 66. ISBN 1-84584-028-3.

Development

Alcyone SVX hood emblem

The Subaru Alcyone SVX debuted as a concept at the 1989 Tokyo Auto Show with styling by noted Italian designer Giorgetto Giugiaro of ItalDesign. The SVX entered production, retaining its window-within-a-window configuration, adapted from the previous generation Subaru Alcyone with an additional extension of glass covering the A-pillar — which Subaru described as an «aircraft-inspired glass-to-glass canopy.»

In contrast to the angular XT, the SVX featured softer lines with its two-piece power side windows. The windows are split about two-thirds of the way from the bottom, with the division being parallel to the upper curve of the door frame similar to the half-windows of the Lamborghini Countach, DMC DeLorean (another Giugiaro design), and the McLaren F1. The SVX featured a drag coefficient of Cd=0.29, identical to that of the XT coupe it replaced. European market cars had a slightly lower wind resistance of Cd=0.285, thanks to a larger undertray.

From 1991 to 1992, Subaru displayed the Amadeus, a prototype shooting brake variation on the SVX, in both two- and four-door versions, which was considered for production. Ultimately the Amadeus was not produced.

External links

Media related to Subaru SVX at Wikimedia Commons

« previous — Subaru, a division of Fuji Heavy Industries, vehicle timeline, 1990s–present

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Related
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« previous — Subaru, a division of Fuji Heavy Industries, vehicle timeline in North America, 1990s–present

Type 1990s 2000s 2010s
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Subcompact Justy (KA)
Impreza  (GD/GG)
Compact Leone/Loyale (AC/AG/AN)
Mid-size Legacy (BC/BF/BJ) Legacy  (BD/BG/BK) Legacy (BE/BH) Legacy (BL/BP) Legacy (BM) Legacy (BN)
Sports coupé XT (AX) SVX (CX) BRZ
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Current
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Engines
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Past
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Concept
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  • Fleet-X (1999)
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  • B9 Scrambler (2003)
  • R1e (2003)
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  • G4e (2007)
  • Hybrid & Advanced Tourer (2009, 2011)
  • Viziv (2013–15)
Miscellaneous
  • Parent: Fuji Heavy Industries
  • Subaru World Rally Team

Motorsports

In 1991, a Subaru SVX, driven by Ken Knight and Bob Dart, won the Alcan Winter Rally, a race starting in Seattle to the Arctic Circle and back.

In the early 1990s there was a Subaru SVX PPG Pace Car. It featured a silver to purple fade paint job, silver wheels in the front, purple wheels in the rear, «SVX» windshield banner, roll cage and an amber roof light. It was evaluated by Wally Dallenbach Sr, Indy Car Chief Steward and PPG Pace Car evaluator. It was used as a promotional tool for Subaru, as well as a pace car. While most pace cars were retired after one season, the SVX proved to be such a worthy example and a favorite, and was used for several seasons. It was in storage for many years in the «Subaru Performance Attic» in Cherry Hill, New Jersey near Subaru of America’s new headquarters in Camden, New Jersey.

Market

Sales of the SVX reached 14,257 in the United States and a total of 24,379 worldwide. 2,478 SVXs were sold in Europe (with 854 headed directly to Germany and 60 to France). Roughly 7,000 of all SVXs sold were right-hand drive models. Included in this number were the 249 vehicles sold in Australia, at a cost between approx. A$73,000 to A$83,000. 5,884 units remained in Japan.

The SVX was also developed and released during Japan’s «bubble economy», and as the economic condition in Japan continued to decline, it had an effect on sales in Japan.[citation needed]

Asia

In Japan, the SVX was the first Subaru to exceed with regards to the vehicles exterior measurements. The SVX also obligated Japanese buyers to pay more annual which limited sales due to the engine displacement. The SVX was not Subaru’s first car to be sold in Japan with an engine bigger than two litres; this honor goes to the preceding Alcyone XT6.

The models offered in Japan were the L (similar to the LSi in the US) and the S4. As a result, in Japan the SVX was considered a luxury vehicle and was equipped appropriately with one-touch climate control, leather interior, front seats that were both electrically adjustable and heated, a single-disc CD player coupled with a Panasonic AM/FM stereo system, that was hidden behind a retractable panel, and a remote-controlled infrared keyless entry with security system. Later S-Four badged versions had 250 hp (186 kW; 253 PS).

Television advertising in Japan used Alison Krauss singing «Five Hundred Miles», a reference to the car being able to travel 805 kilometres (500.2 mi) on one 70 litres (18 US gal) tank of fuel, with a fuel economy of 9.4 L/100 km (30 mpg‑imp; 25 mpg‑US).

North America

A Subaru SVX in the United States.

Subaru introduced the SVX in the United States in July 1991 (as a 1992 model), following the US debut with a Japanese market introduction in September of that same year. The model was designed and marketed as the replacement for the Alcyone XT and Alcyone XT6 coupes. Outside Japan, the Alcyone designation was dropped, and the car was marketed as the Subaru SVX. The 1992 received a facelift inspired by the SVX. The introduction of the SVX followed the 1990 introduction of the Acura NSX and the 1980 introduction of the Isuzu Piazza.

The MSRP) for the US base model 1992 SVX-L was $24,445, with the top of the line model with touring package (leather trim, 8 way electronic seat adjustment, tilt and slide sunroof), the LS-L, listing at $28,000. This was $8,000–$11,000 higher than any previous Subaru. A rear spoiler was optional on the 1992 L and LS-L models and was included as standard equipment beginning in 1993. There was a brief XR model in 1992 that included the spoiler standard but put the vehicle over the import weight limit. As a result, the spoiler was shipped separately. By the end of its production run in 1996, the price had risen to $36,740 for the top-of-the-line LSi, which was the same trim level as the 1992 LS-L

A front-wheel drive version was offered on the SVX during the 1994–1995 model year, which cost about $5,300 less than the AWD version in 1994 and $1500 difference in 1995.[citation needed] In 1994, FWD was offered on both the base L model (X33 in the VIN) and on the mid-range LS model (X34 in the VIN). In 1995, only the base L model was offered in FWD (X33 in the 5th, 6th and 7th digits of the VIN).

With Subaru forecasting sales of 10,000 each year, SVX sales reached 5,280 in 1992 and 3,859 cars in 1993. Production ended in December 1996, with sales continuing into 1997 — and 640 units sold in the final year.

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